Josephine was such a beautiful and talented person making her a perfect icon. This is an ad for her hair product. Here look would look amazing on anyone with warm undertones. Here’s how to get this look:

FACE: Apply a concealer if needed. I love the creaminess of Lancome Maquicomplet Complete Coverage Concealer. Apply a powder foundation such as MAC Studio Fix Powder Foundation. With a powder foundation, no finishing powder is really needed. Josephine’s cheeks are pretty bare. For myself, I would need a little bit of color. Apply a powder bronzer such as Clinique True Bronze Bronzer Powder in your appropriate shade to cheeks. This adds a bit of color and keeps the lipstick from “washing” you out.

EYES: In true theatrical 20’s fashion, eye brows are drawn on pencil thin. Fill in or in Josephine’s case, draw in, brows. Try a product like Covergirl Expert Eyes Brow Pencil. The formula is a bit waxy but it does come in deeper colors. For a “candlelit” glow, apply a slightly shimmery cream shadow such as Too Faced Lockdown Creaseless Cream Eye Shadow. There are two shades of the very neutral Lovey Dovey. Choose the color that suits you. The cream shadow will help “hold” the other shadows that you will use. Choose a medium shimmery bronze such as Vincent Longo Wet Diamond Eyeshadow in Temptest Bronze. Apply this from the lash line to the crease. With eyes open, apply this bronze shade slightly “winging” out. Use the motion that you would use for cateyed liquid liner except at your crease instead of lash line. Take a deep brown shadow such as Jane Eye Zing Super Smooth Shadow in Browny Points. Apply it in the same way as the bronze except stopping just below the copper. Blend. Keep adding until you get your desired variation of a cateyed smoky eyed look. Here’s a trick for this. Take a square of TP and fold it like a triangle. Use this is a template for your shade. Hold this triangle at the outer edge of your lash line in a 45 degree angle. Brush on the shadow. You’ll get an exaggerated look and it will keep the dark colors from getting all over your face. Take a dark brown pencil liner such as Avon Ultra Luxury Eye Liner in Dark Brown and apply it to the upper lash line thickly and winging out. Apply this liner to the bottom lash line and inside the rim. Connect the top and bottom “lines”. Apply a nice mascara such as MAC Pro Lash to top and bottom lashes.

LIPS: Apply a rust colored lip liner such as Lipstick Queen Lip Liner in Rust around your natural lip line. Apply a sheer burnt red lipstick such as Lipstick Queen Lipstick in Rust Saint. Apply a warm coral lip gloss to lips such as MAC Tinted Lipglass in Light That Fire, a coral with gold shimmer.

Crazylilbellule & The Poppies has a Josephine inspired scent in their Les Garçonnes collection: Joséphine Jonquille. It’s a lush blend of jasmine and gourmand dark chocolate.

More Josephine pics here.

So far, I am really loving Les Garçonnes fragrance collection. Pompon Gardenia is an amazing heady white floral blend with sweet lime. This is one of my favorite white florals ever. I love a super feminine white floral and this is a winner with its blend of gardenia, lilies, and lime.

I assume that the inspiration for Pompon Gardenia was François Pompon, a 20’s era sculptor and Rodin’s assistant. I’ve always remembered him for his sleek chouettes. But, it could just be pompon as a fashion accessory. I don’t know for sure and I really don’t care. I love the sleek and portable, ecological cardboard packaging. It’s a lovely poppy print with rich green and mauve. I peeled a bunch of ’36 era wallpaper in my rehab home that reminded me of this print and color scheme.

At first Pompon Gardenia is a lush, humid white gardenia. There is a faint aroma of watermelon and gardenia. This doesn’t smell like a Jolly Rancher watermelon hard candy or too fruity. It just adds a humid quality to the gardenia, something that is more a sweet aquatic quality than just “aquatic”. It’s more “watermelon rind”, a bit green and fresh, bitter and sweet,  and what is keeping it from being like a candy-esque body spray. The sweet lime is an amazing touch to this blend. I love limes for their tart fruitiness and slight sweetness. We always have them around the kitchen. I love the smell that they leave on my hands. It is very beautiful and I always thought it would be perfect with a heady floral. Pompon Gardenia has a very pleasant slightly bitter but mostly sweet type of lime. I’m talking you smell the entire little sweet lime, including zest and juicy pulp. It’s beautiful. All of these fruits mix with dainty white lily of the valley (very understated in comparison) and big, white gardenias. Gardenia works very well with these fruits because gardenia has a slightly fruity aroma anyways. Eventually, the fragrance becomes a strong gardenia fragrance with a sweet lime twist, the watermelon rind fades, so do the other dainty white flowers. After a bit of wear, you pick up on the faintest and mildest tobacco ever. In fact the 1st few weeks that I wore this, I could barely pick up on it. It has been many, many years since I smelled the warmness and hay like quality of dried, light tobacco. I ended up wearing this one day in the summer and my husband drug me to a cigar shop. There I smelled the lovely jars of various flavored and unflavored tobacco. I smelled some that the owner referred to as “mild” and “blonde”. I could then smell this ever so slightly in this solid fragrance blend. It is faint and definitely overshadowed by the white florals. It does add some much needed warmth to the blend. Don’t let the tobacco fool you. This is not a smoky blend, “dry”,  nor is it even close to being masculine. This is a pretty girl wearing an old-fashioned gardenia perfume oil and red lipstick in a quaint tobacco shop. That’s it.

This fragrance isn’t what I expected it to be. When I read the notes when it was launched, I was thinking of something much more dry, smokier with a  less fruity gardenia, and maybe the kind of sweet lime wedge that has been swimming in honey colored whiskey. I was thinking something to wear in cooler weather. I was thinking of a sexy but desperate 20’s lady at a smoky bar with messy, uneven pin-curls. This is much more feminine, alive, pretty, and almost coy. It’s much more 40’s cheesecake pin-up. It is glowing with a bright red lipstick smile exposing more than pearly whites. It’s perfect like a Vargas created girl. Like I said, it wasn’t what I expected but it is something that I really like. I am happy that I bought it. It’s fairly simple aquatic gardenia with lime with a very slight tobacco dry warmth.

It retails for about $16 and is available at b-glowing.com and beautyhabit.com. It’s a great price, cute vintage packaging, and wears for a few hours without any touch-ups. I’m touching up my red lipstick more frequently than this stuff.

Les Garçonnes Tamara Charleston is inspired by Tamara de Lempicka and her amazing paintings. I am so delighted that the dazzling Tamara was the inspiration for this fragrance. The packaging of this one contains the dramatic (and one of my favorite) color combos of chartreuse and aubergine. When I first heard of this collection of Crazysticks, I was very intrigued by this one in particular. It sounded so interesting with notes of gardenia, sambac jasmine, green mandarin, peach, lisylang, freshly cut hay, amber, and absinthe. It is described as a “fresh and flowery cocktail, almost prohibited“. I am pleased with this solid perfume even though it isn’t exactly what I expected. I guess I expected for it to be kind of herbaceous like dried hay with a heavy anise or licorice note. I expected it to be more bitter. I guess I thought it would be heavy on “absinthe”. I would like my “in my mind version” since I love anything licorice, but I could see it turning many people off. Tamara Charleston is much prettier than I could ever imagine and much more interesting that I could ever imagine. It’s fruity, green, raw, floral, and a little bitter.

According to the company’s Olfactive Star, this scent is heaviest on green mandarin, absinthe, and lisylang. I know what the 1st two are, but lisylang, never even heard of it. Well, it is a Robertet creation and is described as an aquatic floral note. So I guess I won’t be getting this wonderful “flower” for my garden, haha. Tamara Charleston wears closely to the skin like other Crazylibellule & The Poppies solid fragrances. It is soft and intimate. When I first put this on my skin and took a whiff, it took me to a place. It really reminded me of something but I didn’t know what. Then it hit me. It reminds me of this abandoned house down the road that I pass on my evening strolls. It is a menacing, rotting craftsman with an unkept yard. This yard grows widly and bears fruits like figs, olive, peaches, apricots, and blackberries with no maintenance. The weeds are grown up and have taken over. Across the street a wild jasmine grows. I will stand there, checking the ripeness of the fruit because I am so bumrushing the fruit trees one day, a warm breeze will go by and it brings in a scent that reminds me of this fragrance. I guess because of the jasmine, unripe fruits, dried out weeds, and a warm sea breeze, it is like this little stick. So I was a bit stunned when I sniffed this. It is much prettier than that abandoned lot but it reminds me of it, I refer to that lot as my secret garden. Anyways, I bet you are ready for a fragrance review.

Tamara Charleston smells fresh and green. It smells almost ammonia-ish from the unripe or green mandarin. This gives a complex and very different citrus to this blend. Strangely this is my favorite note. It smells slightly floral. The blossom smell airy and light. It isn’t like I smell “jasmine” but more that I feel like I am catching the odor of a warm breeze being carried in from a flower garden. I just go “flowers” but I can’t identify them directly. It smells warm and sweet just like cut hay and amber resin. You also get a “warm” fuzziness from an almost perfectly ripe peach. It’s a sweet peach, maybe from a hint of sugar in the absinthe. The absinthe is there and it provides a bitter “green” note. It isn’t licoricey but smells more like if you were standing over a mixed herb garden that contains everything from fennel to juniper.

This scent is a winner. I really like it because I have absolutely nothing like it in my extensive collection. It is fresh, bitter, and green but still really pretty and wearable. I think it is a perfect scent for late summer and early fall. I also love the attention to detail by Crazylibellule & The Poppies. Their inspiration was a hedonistic visual artist. They’ve done nice things like use absinthe in this blend, something historically loved by bohemian artists. “L’Histoire” on the box brings to mind an encounter with one of Tamara’s models and/or lovers. I love solid perfumes and  I love that I carry this cute thing around with me. It is available at beautyhabit.com and b-glowing. com for under $20.

Young Lady with Gloves

Young Lady with Gloves

I must say that I haven’t sniffed any of these yet but I know that I want them all. Sometimes a company just “gets” me. I get branded and I can’t help it. This is what I’ve been “into” for quite sometime, why don’t they just stamp a French bulldog on the package and pair it with some violet mints and a stereoscope and you have consumer me. I am a sucker for this stuff. I may have long hair but I do flaunt 20’s turbans and head wear. I love the elegance of the “flapper” but I promise that I am not obsessed with them. I have more of a Gibson Girl’s tastes, well pair that with a 60’s biker b-film hag’s tastes and you have what I like. Anyways. I love Crazylibellule & The Poppies. These budget friendly solid sticks have not disappointed me yet. I love their intimacy and how well they wear. I also love the designs on the packaging and they are travel friendly. The notes in the fragrances sound really nice (I’m not going to list everything, just a few “key” ones, visit their website or b-glowing’s website for more info). All retail for $18. Les Garçonnes line is all about the flapper. The company states, “A new breed of woman in the 1920’s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair and flounted the conventtional standards of behavior.” So, lets not get my Woman’s Studies minor self talking here, you can romanticize the flapper anyway you want to really, people have always been fascinated by them, especially young, modern gals. In my opinion the flapper was all about consumerism, fashion, smoking, and all of that jazz while still trying to trap a man as a financial investment…but, anyways, back to fragrance here. (Where’s the suffragist fragrance line 🙂 ? )

There is Chère Louise (of course, in honor of Louise Brooks, Lulu, my favorite “flapper”): It has notes of hyacinth, violet, saffron, pepper seed, and patchouli. Sounds like a nice spicy floral. It is housed in a navy and poppy orange colored container with poppies, so cute! (All of the fragrances have that same adorable poppy design like a nice vintage silk handkerchief.)

Hommage A Gabrielle: It has notes of ozonic flower, Indian jasmine, cedar, and Russian leather. It has the poppy container with white and black. I sure hope it is heavy on the leather.

Jeanne Voyage: This has notes of Sicilian bergamot, iris of Florence, heliotrope, and musk. THis one has espresso and blue poppies.

Josephine Jonequille: This has notes of lemon, cardamom, ginger, jasmine, black chocolate, and patchouli. Packaging is navy and yellow and this one “sounds” great for cooler days.

Pompon Gardenia: It has notes of lime, lily of the valley, heliotrope, and tobacco. Packaging is mauve and forest green.

Rose À Saïgon: This has notes of mango, passionfruit, jasmine, ylang-ylang, and vetiver. Packaging is a forest green and magenta.

Tamara Charleston: It has notes of green mandarin, peach absinthe, Sambac jasmine, gardenia, freshly cut hay, and amber. Packaging is a deep purple and chartreuse green.

How badly I want all of these to conjure up a smoky speakeasy! I want them to be heavy on smokey tobacco, leather chairs, the rose often used to scent lipstick, and gin! I definitely know that I want to buy Pompon Gardenia, Tamara Charleston, and Chère Louise. It’s dangerous to purchase unsniffed, I find that I usually would go for the fragrance with the dullest description but I think these seem pretty safe. I have found that in this line most of the fragrances just smell like their “heart” notes despite the lists of other notes. But, trust me, whatever I purchase, you will definitely hear about it here.

The Collection

The Collection